FAQs about Travel to Tasmania header image

FAQs about Travel to Tasmania

Top questions about travel to Tasmania

Simon Mustoe

Simon Mustoe

Writer, photographer and founder of Wildiaries

https://simonmustoe.blog/

You asked, so here are the answers

We received over 600 questions about travel in Tasmania. Here are answers to the most popular questions: 

What's the best time of year to go?

Tasmania is a destination you can visit any time of year. It's ideal for Christmas in July or as a summer season escape from the continent's hotter weather further north. It's well-known for its mid-winter festivals but it is a subantarctic island. Depending on altitude, summer is warm (average about 16-25°C) and cold in the winter (average about 5-16°C).  Rainfall is can heavy and prolonged in the spring and snow fall is common in winter.  However, the north is shielded from the Antarctic and enjoys a Mediterranean style climate year-round.  

How do I get to Tasmania?

Tasmania is reached by mainland flights either to Launceston (in the state's north) or Hobart (in the south) or via the Spirit of Tasmania ferry. If you take the ferry, it's worth noting that you often have to wait a short while in Devonport, before the hire car places open. Of course you can also take your own car over on the ferry too. Using the north as a gateway is worthwhile, because the northwest is really very beautiful.  

How long does it take to see Tasmania?

Tasmania is not a place you can see on a single visit. Tasmania is the size of Switzerland with over 25,000km of roads, 3.4 million hectares of National Park (half of the island) and 5,000km of coastline. You need at least a week to see a portion of the island ... we'd recommend focusing on one area e.g. Hobart and south, north-west or east coast. Ten days is enough time to dip into two regions but you need a fortnight to do it well. You don't want to be spending all your time driving. You can drive from Launceston to Hobart in about 2.5 hours. 

Do I need a car to see Tasmania?

Unless you have a driver-guide, it's going to be difficult to get around much of Tasmania. A hire car is the best way to go, if you're independently travelling. If you're only planning to visit Hobart, there are numerous day-trips you can do without the need for your own vehicle.  

Where is the best place to spot an Aurora?

You may have read lots about the southern lights in Tasmania. Many of the photos you see are long-exposures. Very rarely, does it glisten like the northern lights. Solar activity (the radiation flares that cause this) is on 10-year cycles and 2020 is the bottom-end of activity, so there's less chance at the moment. That said, it can happen any time. It's not something you can fully rely on and while it may be possible, you'd need expert help and the promise of clear-skies. Winter is a calmer period weather-wise and has longer nights. 

Where are good places for photography?

Everywhere! If you're looking for those secret spots, you might want to book time with our photography specialist. Just enquire and ask ; )

What are the best walking locations?

The Three Capes Lodge Walk is particularly popular.  There's also the Bay of Fires Walk, the Cradle Mountain Huts walk and the Maria Island Walk. If you're planning a trip with a guide, they will know various locations you can explore. Almost everywhere in Tasmania, there are walks to take your breath away. 

What are the best wildlife locations?

In the south, Bruny Island is spectacular. If you have a nature guide, you can see Little Penguins and Short-tailed Shearwaters (seasonal), Eastern Quolls, Long-nosed Potoroo, Swamp Wallabies (the white forms are found in the south) and the rate 40-spotted Pardalote. Maria Island is also great. Wombats, Cape Barren Geese are among the most frequently animals. In the north of Tasmania, you can arrange trips to stay in log-cabins and view wild Tasmanian Devils.  

What are the top things to do in Tasmania?

There are just too many to mention. Imagine a day in World Heritage-listed wilderness, in the company of a life-long advocate of the island’s spectacular walks. Imagine a day learning to fly-fish. What about a gourmet food or drink tour tailored to you? Learn about wooden ship building or convict heritage. Visit a contemporary art gallery New Yorkers talk about, or watch Tasmanian devils in their natural habitat from the window of your own log cabin deep in the forest. You can see a different side of Hobart by cycling one of the city’s trails, or join a group to kayak around historic Constitution Dock. Spend a day river rafting and tasting local produce, take a flight into one of the world’s most remote forests, watch soaring albatrosses, journey by steam train along mountain passes or sail aboard a tall ship or a Sydney-to-Hobart racing yacht for lunch in a secluded cove in the D’Entrecasteaux Channel. Take our word for it, Tasmania is an extraordinary place to visit.

Here are a few ideas to browse: https://deluxelife.com.au/blog/tasmania-top-10-things-to-do-travel-australia

What are some good road trips to do?

There are loads of options and we have a few listed, from which we can tailor some opportunities. Here are some to start with: 

What are the best places to eat and drink?

No chance of listing everything here, as the whole country is a gourmet feast to enjoy. If you really want to know from an insider, then we'd recommend buying a copy of Tailored Tasmania by Alice Hansen. https://www.tailoredtasmania.com/

Tailored Tasmania



 

About the Author
Simon Mustoe

Simon Mustoe

Writer, photographer and founder of Wildiaries

https://simonmustoe.blog/

Simon has been studying and observing wildlife for over 40 years and for about 30 of that, writing stories, taking photographs and making short films. His observations and experience extend to travelling extensively through Australia and eastern Indonesia discovering new and exciting travel opportunities, as well as contributing to science and conservation. Simon is passionate about conservation and the impact travel can have on the lives of people in remote places. 

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